I made headdresses! And updated things!

After much suspense, we have finally added new products to our web store! And be sure to stay tuned, because we’ll be adding a lot more stuff. Most of it is handmade by me, and some is sourced to be a good inclusion in one’s beginning Lolita wardrobe (make up, eyelashes, etc.)…

Clothing

Most of my sizes are default small or medium. The mannequin shown in all pictures is a 26.5″ waist and 34″ Bust, which according to this chart, is a small. However, things like skirts, jumpskirts, and even dresses (one pieces) have shirring in the back to allow for multi-size wear. The tea party dress, in particular, could fit up to 38″ bust and 32″ waist. It is loosely fit on the mannequin I have and has full shirring in the back – which is why it’s classified as a M/L.

Custom sizes are always available upon inquiry. Please be sure to take your measurements correctly with a tailor’s tape measure (the soft ones, not a carpenter’s tape measure :P ).

Black and Gold Filigree SkirtTea Party JSK-1 Pintuck Blouse 1 - Short Sleeve-1 Ice Cream Parlour Skirt-1-2 Creamy Bloomers-6

Headdresses

In the first picture, I used a pattern from Otome no Sewing Book 5. I call it a rigid headdress because it has an ultra firm inferfacing. The second is a typical round headdress but the lace all around it was crocheted by hand (by me!) as well as hand made ribbon roses with pearl accents. The third is a flower crown type headband. I enjoyed wearing it on Sunday of the Santa Fe Comic Con. :)

Pink Lace - Rigid Headdress-3 Crochet Lace Round Headdress-2 Pink and Purple Rose Half Crown-2

Otome no Sewing Book 5 – Rigid Headdress

Rigid Headdress 3_smOkay, so it’s always possible something got lost in translation. A lot of the time, I don’t translate every word in the instructions given in these books. Most of the construction methods for the clothes are basic (to me) and I can figure out how things are put together without painstakingly translating everything that’s said. I also draft lining pieces and make my clothes fully lined, which is not included in any of these books. For the blouses, I add things like plackets instead of just leaving the seam a little open, therefore making my work a touch more professional.

I made this “rigid headdress” according to some of the instructions. I had to cut out a piece of Ultra Firm interfacing (Pellon, our trusty interfacing friend) 9cm x 24cm. However, now that I look at the directions, I think this was slightly wrong, as it was indicating how large to cut the overlayed fabric to the “bonne foundation” ( ボンネ土台 ) piece. The ボンネ土台 or “bonne foundation” (bonne = bonnet) is listed as a “commercially available” item and to buy 1 unit. So it’s a ready-made thing that, if you were living in Japan, you could probably buy at any of their major craft stores (Tomato!! <3 ). Unfortunately for me, these things are impossible to find here in the states. I can barely find it if I put in the Japanese text into google, even! Lots of pictures, but this tells me nothing about what they would be called in English, or where I can buy the “bonne foundation” thingy anyway.

I guess if you were into millinery and hat making, you’d use buckram with millinery wire (part of the instructions indicate bending the headdress to the curve of one’s head). You’d make your own shape similar to what’s pictured – I noticed a tapering at both ends in the pictures of the finished product and wondered why it looked different to the pattern piece indication that’s perfectly oval. After making this tapered oval shape out of heavyweight buckram, you’d line the edges with wire and cover it crinoline bias tape. Then make the exact same shape out of quilt batting. Make the shape indicated in the book (9cm x 24cm) and cover your piece, basting around the edges, and pulling the thread to gather it on the underside of the head piece.

I’m sure all this is much easier if you could just buy the base “bonne” thing, but you could make it yourself. Or you could do what I did and just use Ultra Firm II by Pellon.

Some places in the U.S. like Hobby Lobby carry Clover brand products, and I went ahead and bought four different sizes and types of “flower making plates”. A little time consuming, but it does make pretty flowers! My headdress, however, was made with traditional ribbon roses using 2″ double face satin ribbon. No template needed for that. :)

Here are the instructions for the headdress and flower making.

Rigid Headdress 1Rigid Headdress 2